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Olympics Green Diving Pool

Not in Rio for the Summer 2016 Olympics? Neither are we, but after seeing these photos – we’re not exactly green with envy that we aren’t there. It looks like something weird has definitely happened to the Olympic diving pool in Rio – virtually overnight divers find themselves competing in water that had turned from…

Not in Rio for the Summer 2016 Olympics? Neither are we, but after seeing these photos – we’re not exactly green with envy that we aren’t there. It looks like something weird has definitely happened to the Olympic diving pool in Rio – virtually overnight divers find themselves competing in water that had turned from crystal clear blue into an all too familiar shade of green. Trust me, there is no one lining up to jump into a green pool with a serious algae problem.

What are the consequences of swimming in a green pool?

Aside from that slimy feeling one gets, the algae itself promotes rapid bacteria growth – swallowing, breathing or coming into contact with these germs can lead to many illnesses such as E. Coli, Giardia, and skin rashes. While we’re certain that a little E. Coli wouldn’t deter the likes of Michael Phelps, we can be happy that all is right in his pool. Although after winning 2 gold medals, you’d think he’d look a little happier.


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One of the biggest questions asked during the first week of the 2016 summer Olympics in Rio was why did those pools turn green? People watching the Olympics were shocked to see the sparkling blue waters of the diving pool at the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center to turn a dark and sinister green hue on Aug. 9. Less than 24 hours, the pool used for water polo and synchronized swimming turned a similar shade.

Now, we have an official answer for the color shift — human error that led to 160 liters of hydrogen peroxide being mistakenly dumped into the pools on Aug. 5, the New York Times reports. Olympics officials said that the hydrogen peroxide “neutralized” the chlorine in the pools, making way for the growth of “organic compounds” that possibly included algae.

To answer the question: How does one keep an Olympic sized pool free from algae? The secret, according to pool pros is to keep the water moving! Salt Chlorine generators do a great job at preventing algae growth as well as adding an algaecide each week to prevent algae from building up in the pool.

Author: Pool Markerter
Pool Marketer is an Internet Magazine with informative consumer information about swimming pools, pool life style, maintaining pools, pool features and pool equipment.